Archive for the ‘Georgia schools’ Tag

What Can I Say That Hasn’t Already Been Said?   2 comments

DISCLAIMER: I tried to avoid writing this because I knew I could go on and on. I suggest you only read this if you have time to read from start to finish! You’ve been warned!

Well, aside from the childhood favorite: ‘I told you so.’ I am no longer a child, but I’ll be damned if I didn’t think that exact thought in my head when what I and anyone else with common sense already knew the final report regarding the cheating allegations within the Atlanta Public School System was released. There was, in fact, cheating going on during the previous years’ CRCT administrations. And by ‘cheating’ I do not mean students looking on other students’ test sheets. I mean teachers and administrators erased answers in an effort to boost the schools’ and district’s test scores and ensure that both made Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP).

Quite honestly, I do not know where to begin with this tomfoolery. On the one hand, you have the students who thought they passed the test on their own merit; I am sure some of them did. But on the other hand, you have teachers and administrators who violated testing protocol to ensure that their school made AYP. (READ: They cheated to make sure they got bonuses and kept their jobs.) Some staff members even resorted to ‘cheating parties,’ where they took answer sheets to the home of an administrator during the weekend to change answers. So now we have not one, but two testing violations: (1) Changing answers on a testing sheet; and (2) removing test documents from the school building without the authority to do so.

I decided against blogging about it (see how long that lasted?) and opted to tweet a few thoughts instead:

It’s possible very likely that everyone involved (meaning teachers and administrators) will lose their licenses and/or face stricter penalties. (The state education officials need a scapegoat.) Kathy Augustine has been  placed on leave as the new superintendent of the DeSoto Independent School District and local media sources are in Maui trying to locate Beverly Hall….and no, this is not a soap opera – I am still in the process of writing my blog. The truly sad part in this entire matter is that no one will address the issues and instances of bullying and intimidation suffered at the hands of administrators, area superintendents and the like. I am sure state officials will find other ways to tighten test security; however, the damage, not completely irreparable, has already been done. Someone needs to do the right, ethical, and difficult thing by addressing school culture and leadership. In this case, lack thereof ethical and moral leadership. But I know that people in authority roles are more interested in making friends/political allies and forging mutually beneficial (monetary) partnerships. As I stated earlier: Officials need a sacrificial lamb. In this case, they got 178 of them.

Now what? Grade inflation scandal? Those of us who have ever served time (pun intended) in a classroom already know that pressure exists to inflate grades to boost passing rates and G.P.A.s. I guess we need to wait another 5-10 years before ‘officials’ catch-on to that one. But I digress….

Parting thought: I dodged a bullet.

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As a Christian, it’s my God-given responsibility to offend you in any way possible   6 comments

Ouch. It literally turned my stomach to write that title, but that is the exact attitude that some self-proclaimed Christians exude. They judge non-Christians, homosexuals/gays, single mothers (never the fathers of those out-of-wedlock babies), and anyone else who does not fit into their definition of a Christian. Never mind that simple and straight-to-the-point verse that says: ‘Judge not, that ye be not judged.’ (Matthew 7:1) Simply stated: Remember when you point the finger, three are pointing back at you. But sadly, not very many people are willing to openly judge the decision of the Cherokee County Board of Education to continue holding commencement ceremonies inside a church even though Jewish students have expressed their discomfort with the venue selection. I have a few issues with the board’s decision and the lack of support shown for the impending graduates as well as former Jewish students who missed their graduations because they were held in churches…

1. Did our country decide to do away with the ‘separation of church and state’ thingy and someone forgot to click ‘Send’ on the memo? If not, then why are publicly funded schools showing favor towards one religion (Christianity) by holding a school-sponsored (and funded) event inside a facility owned and operated by said religion? I sat through a Christian prayer at a publicly-funded school board meeting, where no recognition was given to any other religion. Is that not showing favoritism?

2. We encourage our kids to go to school, work hard, and earn good grades to prepare for college or other post-secondary plans. A high school graduation is the pinnacle of 13+ years of rules, early morning classes, uninteresting subjects/teachers, and overbearing education bureaucrats, yet some kids will miss that ceremony because they are not in the Christian ‘clique.’ As a student, I’d be pretty pissed. As a parent, I would support my child’s decision not to attend. But those two things are not enough. Oddly though, I doubt that any board of education in the bible belt would even seriously consider using a synagogue, mosque, or whatever as the venue for a high school graduation. Not a snowball’s chance in hell….

3. The justification excuse provided by the board is that other venues are too costly to rent for graduation ceremonies. During these tough economic times I can understand the need to tighten the purse strings, but someone will loosen them enough to pay the costs associated with renting the church. OK, so maybe the cost argument was a bad lame attempt to mask their lack of respect for Jewish students’ First Amendment Right. Perhaps to avoid conveying an attitude of apathy, the board could have decided to find a venue interested in a tax write-off (afterall, K-12 schools are non-profits) or they could have even opted to charge for tickets above the normal allotment of three per student. Maybe those options make too much sense…

I am not naive. I know that you cannot please all of the people all of the time, but this entire ‘discussion’ could have been avoided if the board, parents, and students of Cherokee County addressed the issue when it first arose several years ago. Usually, to avoid a repeat problems in the future most well-meaning people address them when they occur. Instead, the board would rather face a lawsuit (funded by tax payers), willingly accept the fact that well-deserving (Jewish) students miss their graduations, and reiterate what I have said time and time again: We still have a very long way to go and we ARE NOT living in a post-racial/religious/gender identity or anything-else society.

Monise, who is stealing imitating the style of her friend Jose Vilson and ending her blog with this thought: If she doesn’t stop fussin, cussin, and carrying-on like a heathen, she will be waiting on ‘Stand-by’ for her seat in heaven. Amen.

Special Education: Public Education’s red-headed stepchild   Leave a comment

It’s a New Year, but I didn’t make any major resolutions for the year. I have recommitted myself to the same resolution I have made for the past 3 or 4 years: To have more patience with adults. I can deal with kids, their incessant questions, and energy. I expect grown, ‘educated’ folks to know better. Pretty sad when you have to make the same resolution year after year. I guess that’s the price you pay for being in the Education business. Anyway, I was checking the AJC for Maureen Downey’s ‘Get Schooled’ blog to see if she posted anything new. Today’s post, ‘Clayton professors describes “forgotten rooms” and children in alternative schools‘, was of particular interest to me because I am a former Special Education teacher. The article may carry a certain level of shock-value to the average person, but as a former educator, not much surprises me. I will admit that the principal’s nonchalance about the room’s existence is one of the reasons why I it is difficult for me to have patience with adults. She could have refused to use that room, especially knowing that a student hanged himself at another Georgia school in one such room.

But this post is not about that school, or the other 50 that still use the seclusion rooms for students deemed ‘too dangerous’ for their classrooms. As I have said before, if you tell someone something over and over, they begin to manifest those words but that’s a different blog altogether! I am writing this because I am somewhat pissed off. Why does it take this book, or any other, to draw attention to the apathetic attitude towards most Special Education programs and the students receiving services? For those of you teaching, have you noticed that classes for students in Special Education are all located in one area of the building? In trailers? If so, did you realize that was illegal? Probably not because no one wants you to know that. I raised that issue my first year teaching and was told “That’s the way it’s always been?” Of course, being the smartass that I am, asked “Does that make it right?” It’s no wonder kids are embarrassed about their different abilities: They are secluded and reminded of their disabilities for 8 hours a day, 5 days a week, in front of the entire school! When you have some time, read up on the Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) provision in IDEA. I am still amazed that some teachers/administrators/districts make no qualms about violating federal law.

Another issue I raised during my first year (yeah, in case you are wondering, I was in the principal’s office more than my students) was regarding the sham they call ‘Collaborative Teaching’ (also known as Co-Teaching/Inclusion). I had the opportunity to teach in that arrangement twice during my first year. The first semester was perfect: The General Education teacher and I actually both taught. She knew that I had a degree in History, so there was no issue about whether I knew the content. The students understood that we were both teachers, equally responsible for instruction, discipline, etc. In fact, our arrangement was so great that we never needed a sub when the other was out. Second semester was a completely different beast. I was assigned to ‘Co-teach’ in a U.S. History classroom. Well, that teacher felt that since I was a Special Education teacher I couldn’t possibly know anything about U.S. History. I didn’t have any space in her classroom; I was told that she would handle ‘her’ students and I would handle ‘mine.’ Never mind the fact that none of the students liked or respected her….Well, the semester progressed and I had made several requests to the department chair and principal about getting a Teacher’s edition. The principal told me that because I was the Special Education teacher, I was not entitled to a Teacher’s edition. Ha! The average person would have believed that and threw in the towel. I ain’t average, by any stretch of the imagination. I contacted the district office to get information on the correct procedure. The Lead Special Education Teacher assured me that I was entitled to those resources since I had students in the class. Guess what arrived a few days later? I will say that after that incident, I no longer questioned or defended myself when they referred to me as a Yankee. Damn straight! I don’t have a doormat on my back. I am sure they were glad to see me go!

That was a small victory. Unfortunately, the kind of advocates needed for Special Education are ‘Always outnumbered, always outgunned.’ I was fighting for more than a book. Hell, I could care less about the actual book but more about the message those attitudes send to the students. They have rights. Not just the right to a Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE), but to be treated equally, with dignity and respect. Textbooks can’t teach those lessons. I hope every Special Education teacher finds his or her voice to ensure your students have the resources they need to be successful. The lesson starts with us.

Special Education: Public Education's red-headed stepchild   Leave a comment

It’s a New Year, but I didn’t make any major resolutions for the year. I have recommitted myself to the same resolution I have made for the past 3 or 4 years: To have more patience with adults. I can deal with kids, their incessant questions, and energy. I expect grown, ‘educated’ folks to know better. Pretty sad when you have to make the same resolution year after year. I guess that’s the price you pay for being in the Education business. Anyway, I was checking the AJC for Maureen Downey’s ‘Get Schooled’ blog to see if she posted anything new. Today’s post, ‘Clayton professors describes “forgotten rooms” and children in alternative schools‘, was of particular interest to me because I am a former Special Education teacher. The article may carry a certain level of shock-value to the average person, but as a former educator, not much surprises me. I will admit that the principal’s nonchalance about the room’s existence is one of the reasons why I it is difficult for me to have patience with adults. She could have refused to use that room, especially knowing that a student hanged himself at another Georgia school in one such room.

But this post is not about that school, or the other 50 that still use the seclusion rooms for students deemed ‘too dangerous’ for their classrooms. As I have said before, if you tell someone something over and over, they begin to manifest those words but that’s a different blog altogether! I am writing this because I am somewhat pissed off. Why does it take this book, or any other, to draw attention to the apathetic attitude towards most Special Education programs and the students receiving services? For those of you teaching, have you noticed that classes for students in Special Education are all located in one area of the building? In trailers? If so, did you realize that was illegal? Probably not because no one wants you to know that. I raised that issue my first year teaching and was told “That’s the way it’s always been?” Of course, being the smartass that I am, asked “Does that make it right?” It’s no wonder kids are embarrassed about their different abilities: They are secluded and reminded of their disabilities for 8 hours a day, 5 days a week, in front of the entire school! When you have some time, read up on the Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) provision in IDEA. I am still amazed that some teachers/administrators/districts make no qualms about violating federal law.

Another issue I raised during my first year (yeah, in case you are wondering, I was in the principal’s office more than my students) was regarding the sham they call ‘Collaborative Teaching’ (also known as Co-Teaching/Inclusion). I had the opportunity to teach in that arrangement twice during my first year. The first semester was perfect: The General Education teacher and I actually both taught. She knew that I had a degree in History, so there was no issue about whether I knew the content. The students understood that we were both teachers, equally responsible for instruction, discipline, etc. In fact, our arrangement was so great that we never needed a sub when the other was out. Second semester was a completely different beast. I was assigned to ‘Co-teach’ in a U.S. History classroom. Well, that teacher felt that since I was a Special Education teacher I couldn’t possibly know anything about U.S. History. I didn’t have any space in her classroom; I was told that she would handle ‘her’ students and I would handle ‘mine.’ Never mind the fact that none of the students liked or respected her….Well, the semester progressed and I had made several requests to the department chair and principal about getting a Teacher’s edition. The principal told me that because I was the Special Education teacher, I was not entitled to a Teacher’s edition. Ha! The average person would have believed that and threw in the towel. I ain’t average, by any stretch of the imagination. I contacted the district office to get information on the correct procedure. The Lead Special Education Teacher assured me that I was entitled to those resources since I had students in the class. Guess what arrived a few days later? I will say that after that incident, I no longer questioned or defended myself when they referred to me as a Yankee. Damn straight! I don’t have a doormat on my back. I am sure they were glad to see me go!

That was a small victory. Unfortunately, the kind of advocates needed for Special Education are ‘Always outnumbered, always outgunned.’ I was fighting for more than a book. Hell, I could care less about the actual book but more about the message those attitudes send to the students. They have rights. Not just the right to a Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE), but to be treated equally, with dignity and respect. Textbooks can’t teach those lessons. I hope every Special Education teacher finds his or her voice to ensure your students have the resources they need to be successful. The lesson starts with us.